The huff and puff of ESG investing

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As a follow-up to our recent blog on ESG investing we note that the government in Canada has announced the legalisation of cannabis for all uses. Meanwhile in the UK the drug is still illegal, but specialist clinicians will be able to legally prescribe cannabis-derived medicinal products to patients with exceptional clinical need. So how does this sit within the investment debate over Ethical, Social and Governance investing?

The leading Canadian company to get onboard the marijuana puff is called Canopy Growth Corporation. It is the first Canadian cannabis grower to debut on the New York Stock Exchange with a valuation of more than US$10 billion. Putting this into perspective, Canopy is now worth more than Canadian company Bombardier, one of the largest global aerospace businesses and manufacturers of many trains in the UK. Like ‘dotcom’ and ‘bitcon’ before, is cannabis the next tulip bubble and how should charities approach this possible investment?

Ethically, there has been significant clinical evidence to support the legalisation of cannabis as a treatment of many medical and psychotic problems. Socially, despite the health benefits, marijuana is illegal in the UK and many other countries. Campaigners highlight its link to violent behaviour and serious mental health problems. As far as governance is concerned, charities may be split as to the merits of having exposure to cannabis production in their portfolios depending on whether it is for recreational or medicinal use. But surely it would be difficult for charities to advocate putting pressure on the UK government to follow the example set in Canada?

While cannabis may boost financial returns in a global portfolio, is a useful example as to why charities find ESG investing both confusing and difficult.