Investments

Why charities need to engage

red_light_2.jpg

At Yoke, we like to cycle to meetings. It keeps us fit and cuts our carbon footprint. While some say cycling in London or any city is dangerous, we manage the risks and take appropriate time between meetings, keeping within the law. The biggest risk on the road tends to be other cyclists or pedestrians, who do not appear to be aware of the rules of the road. 

We notice that it common for pedestrians at crossings wait for a bike to pass, when it is the person on foot’s right of way. This is because many cyclists think they are in charge and ignore the highway code by crossing red lights and zebra crossings, so pedestrians are naturally confused and avoidable accidents can occur.

An excellent recently published report entitled Time and Money highlights that charities who rely on investments to support their long-term mission can take advantage of their ability to make and spend more money and encourage good corporate behaviour. However, short-term thinking can get in the way.

Trustees can unwittingly be blown off-course and when investing for the long-term. It is important that Trustees should be committed and ambitious, not complacent, continually attending to the proper management of their assets but never losing sight of the main charitable goal.

Why do we link the poor pedestrian to a report about investment management for charities?  In many cases an investment manager attends the charity meeting and for usually 30 minutes, they entertain client with stories from the market. Rarely does the charity engage. Like the pedestrian at the crossing who is used to the cyclist ruling the road, charities tend not to challenge. 

Charities must engage, not be entertained, when it comes to investment. They must understand the risks and investment objectives. While the manager can advise, it is the charity that is in control and they must have the confidence to remind themselves of what they want from these assets, assess whether or not they are getting what they want, and if not, decide what action to take.   

Investment managers should also encourage their clients to be engaged by basing their presentation of how well they are fulfilling the mandate they have been given against the benchmark the charity has set. Fabulous tales of the far east and what’s going on in the Silicon Valley is simply entertainment and adds very little to the Trustees’ understanding of whether they are achieving their long term goals.

Like the pedestrian, trustees need to enforce their right and be in control of where they are going to avoid unnecessary accidents.  

A false stop - having confidence and conviction on future returns

saving-spending-1200x630-630x315.jpg

We've just come across an old report dated 2013 from an investment management firm.

It sensibly suggested that portfolio returns had been so good that they must now be unsustainable and charities should begin to reduce the spending they funded from their endowment. There were many other similar reports making the same point and also suggesting charities should reduce their spending. So what did happen?

In fact the world’s stock markets went up by almost 16% a year for the next four years, an astonishing rise by any standards, especially when inflation barely moved above 1% a year. Longer-term analysis, based on Barclays data, shows the real return on UK and US equities, from 1900 to 2016, was 5% and 6.6% respectively.

If you were a charity trustee or executive in 2013 and received that advice from your professional adviser, what did you do? Did you do as advised and accept a lower distribution and lower spending? If you did, what choice did you have in the face of such confident advice?

Think of it another way: if a fundraiser had said that they wanted a lower their fund raising target for the year because they had done so well recently it couldn’t carry on, what would you do? Both markets reply on past performance and there is no guarantee that this will continue.

A trustee should listen, understand, push back and then decide. Trustees and CEOs are much better at pushing back when they are familiar with the subject, such as fund raising, but in a world such as investment management it often appears too complex or high risk to ask some of these very basic questions.

This shouldn’t be the case, and trustees have a duty to push back to make sure that the advice they are being given is reasonable and reliable - whether its comes from a fund raiser or a fund manager. That’s the law and this responsibility lies ‘upstream’ of the normal business of the investment management community and amongst trustees and the executive themselves. One common barrier to this taking place is the absence of any ‘neutral’ support that charities can call upon when trying to push back – everyone has an angle - so the key is to find the one that is most trustworthy for the task in hand. 

For most charities, they have a degree of discretion on both income and expenditure. Even the best budgets allow or forecast for some volatility of these measures as there is no certainty. 

There can be no doubt that where trustees did push back against such advice in 2013 and stayed with their spending plans (or even increased them), their charities would have made a distinct additional contribution for many people who were experiencing times of considerable hardship. If they had been wrong, they still had the chance to pull up the drawbridge, but not before they had made sure everyone was inside.